The last several years have seen a surge in dialogues, papers and debates on the ethics of AI, and a multitude of similar frameworks designed to guide the ethical design, development and deployment of AI. Most of these initiatives are steeped in European moral and ethical traditions and, while very important, have not necessarily taken into account the diversity of philosophical thought and insight that the world has to offer. This Dialogue on Ethics of Artificial Intelligence: Exploring Pluri-perspectives explores what various Asian schools of philosophical enquiry have to offer the global effort to understand and operationalise an ethical approach to AI. Agenda: Day 1 (24 May, 2021) Inaugural session | 18:00 – 18:30 (IST) Session 1 | 18:30 – 20:00 Reimagining humanity: Alan Turing asked in the 1950s if a machine could “think”, an ability at the heart of the anthropocentrism of many major philosophical and spiritual traditions. This session will explore the cognition landscape of AI, the futurist idea of the singularity of human-machine integration, philosophical investigations on the meaning and future of humanity, and implications of the emergence of “real” artificial intelligence on assigning human ethical duties, rights, and privileges to machines. Given the current developments, how would the spread of AI challenge the prevailing ethical frameworks? How are these frameworks to be re-engineered, and in what desired directions? Session 2 | 20:00 – 21:30 Can a robot be a moral agent? With the technological progress of AI rooted in the optimization and efficiency discourses, particularly as [More]
The last several years have seen a surge in dialogues, papers and debates on the ethics of AI, and a multitude of similar frameworks designed to guide the ethical design, development and deployment of AI. Most of these initiatives are steeped in European moral and ethical traditions and, while very important, have not necessarily taken into account the diversity of philosophical thought and insight that the world has to offer. This Dialogue on Ethics of Artificial Intelligence: Exploring Pluri-perspectives explores what various Asian schools of philosophical enquiry have to offer the global effort to understand and operationalise an ethical approach to AI. Agenda: Day 1 (24 May, 2021) Inaugural session | 18:00 – 18:30 (IST) Session 1 | 18:30 – 20:00 Reimagining humanity: Alan Turing asked in the 1950s if a machine could “think”, an ability at the heart of the anthropocentrism of many major philosophical and spiritual traditions. This session will explore the cognition landscape of AI, the futurist idea of the singularity of human-machine integration, philosophical investigations on the meaning and future of humanity, and implications of the emergence of “real” artificial intelligence on assigning human ethical duties, rights, and privileges to machines. Given the current developments, how would the spread of AI challenge the prevailing ethical frameworks? How are these frameworks to be re-engineered, and in what desired directions? Session 2 | 20:00 – 21:30 Can a robot be a moral agent? With the technological progress of AI rooted in the optimization and efficiency discourses, particularly as [More]
AI applications are ubiquitous – and so is their potential to exhibit unintended bias. Algorithmic and automation biases and algorithm aversion all plague the human-AI partnership, eroding trust between people and machines that learn. But can bias be eradicated from AI? AI systems learn to make decisions based on training data, which can include biased human decisions and reflect historical or social inequities, resulting in algorithmic bias. The situation is exacerbated when employees uncritically accept the decisions made by their artificial partners. Equally problematic is when workers categorically mistrust these decisions. Join our panel of industry and academic leaders, who will share their technological, legal, organizational and social expertise to answer the questions raised by emerging artificial intelligence capabilities. Moderator: Dr Fay Cobb Payton is a Professor of Information Systems & Technology at NC State’s Poole College of Management and a Program Director at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Computer and Network Systems Panelists: Timnit Gebru- Research scientist and the co-lead of the Ethical AI team at Google and the co-founder of Black in AI, a place for fostering collaborations to increase the presence of Black people in the field of Artificial Intelligence Brenda Leong- Senior Counsel and Director of Artificial Intelligence and Ethics at the Future of Privacy Forum Professor Mohammad Jarrahi- Associate Professor at UNC’s School of Information and Library Science focused on the intersection of technology and society Chris Wicher- Rethinc. Labs AI Research Fellow, former Director of AI Research at KPMG’s AI Center [More]
Today’s guest is Matt Zeiler, Founder, and CEO of Clarifai. Clarifai is one of the first startups to apply modern deep learning for image recognition. Their tools are currently used by clients like Staples, OpenTable, and the US Department of Defense (DoD). In this episode, Matt sheds light on the company’s founding story and how an internship at Google was the catalyst for the creation of Clarifai. He also talks about what it’s like competing against industry giants like Facebook and Google. Clarifai’s algorithm and their ability to collaborate rather than compete with their clients truly sets them apart. Matt also sheds light on the benefits of the network effect for both the customers and the company. Matt talks about some of the interesting use cases of their technology, like Trivago, which uses image recognition to organize hotel photos or how the DoD uses it in natural disaster recovery. Matt believes that AI is a great service to the government in helping citizens in many ways, and Clarifai is incredibly proud to be a partner. Tune in to learn more about AI image recognition and be inspired by Matt. Key Points From This Episode -Learn more about Matt’s background, his Ph.D., and what ultimately led him to start Clarifai -Seven years on: Clarifai’s products, their customers and how they use the products -Some of the other applications of AI that Clarifai is potentially interested in getting into -How Clarifai aims to gain a competitive advantage -Why the API model works [More]
My talk delivered at the conference ‘The Digital World: AI’ organised by BSI in London, 27th February 2020. The full video with all the talks posted by BSI can be seen here: https://youtu.be/bDJyLur5_eI
How do we enable decentralised control of AI, and ultimately AGI? In his presentation at the 2019 Rise of AI Conference, Dr. Goertzel presents SingularityNET’s approach to mustering the power of decentralized AI and connecting the centralised, corporate world to open source, decentralised technology. —- SingularityNET is a decentralized marketplace for artificial intelligence. We aim to create the world’s global brain with a full-stack AI solution powered by a decentralized protocol. We gathered the leading minds in machine learning and blockchain to democratize access to AI technology. Now anyone can take advantage of a global network of AI algorithms, services, and agents. Website: https://singularitynet.io Forum: https://community.singularitynet.io Telegram: https://t.me/singularitynet Twitter: https://twitter.com/singularity_net Facebook: https://facebook.com/singularitynet.io Instagram: https://instagram.com/singularitynet.io Github: https://github.com/singnet Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/singularitynet
Watch the newest video from Big Think: https://bigth.ink/NewVideo Join Big Think Edge for exclusive videos: https://bigth.ink/Edge ———————————————————————————- The hard problem of consciousness, as coined by the philosopher David Chalmers, asks: Why must we be conscious? Given that the brain is an information processing engine, why does it need to feel like anything to be us? The problem of AI consciousness is equally complicated. We know humans are conscious, but when it comes to AI, the question is: Could the AIs that we humans develop be conscious beings? Could it feel like something to be them? And how could we possibly know for sure, short of them telling us? How might superintelligence render consciousness extinct? Over 6 chapters in this video, philosopher and cognitive scientist Susan Schneider explores the philosophical problems that underlie the development of AI and the nature of conscious minds. ———————————————————————————- ABOUT BIG THINK: Smarter Faster™ Big Think is the leading source of expert-driven, actionable, educational content — with thousands of videos, featuring experts ranging from Bill Clinton to Bill Nye, we help you get smarter, faster. S​ubscribe to learn from top minds like these daily. Get actionable lessons from the world’s greatest thinkers & doers. Our experts are either disrupting or leading their respective fields. ​We aim to help you explore the big ideas and core skills that define knowledge in the 21st century, so you can apply them to the questions and challenges in your own life. Other Frequent contributors include Michio Kaku & Neil DeGrasse [More]
IBM Watson is a cognitive computing system. This introductory-level talk will explore what cognitive computing means, where cognitive computing came from, what makes a system cognitive, why it is important, who uses it, and how to try it out. Listen to this session to learn how people are using Artificial Intelligence applications across industries, such as transportation, entertainment and healthcare. Ivan is senior IT Architect at IBM Global Business Services. A prolific author and speaker, he is recognized for his innovative work in data science, robotics and cognitive computing. Ivan is member of the IBM Academy of Technology. @iportilla https://www.linkedin.com/in/ivanportilla/ This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx