A self-driving car has a split second to decide whether to turn into oncoming traffic or hit a child who has lost control of her bicycle. An autonomous drone needs to decide whether to risk the lives of busload of civilians or lose a long-sought terrorist. How does a machine make an ethical decision? Can it “learn” to choose in situations that would strain human decision making? Can morality be programmed? We will tackle these questions and more as the leading AI experts, roboticists, neuroscientists, and legal experts debate the ethics and morality of thinking machines.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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Original Program Date: June 4, 2016
MODERATOR: Bill Blakemore
PARTICIPANTS: Fernando Diaz, Colonel Linell Letendre, Gary Marcus, Matthias Scheutz, Wendell Wallach

Can Life and Death Decisions Be Coded? 00:00

Siri… What is the meaning of life? 1:49

Participant introductions 4:01

Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics 6:22

In 1966 ELIZA was one of the first artificial intelligence systems. 10:20

What is ALPHAGO? 15:43

TAY Tweets the first AI twitter bot. 19:25

Can you test learning Systems? 26:31

Robots and automatic reasoning demonstration 30:31

How do driverless cars work? 39:32

What is the trolley problem? 49:00

What is autonomy in military terms? 56:40

Are landmines the first automated weapon? 1:10:30

Defining how artificial intelligence learns 1:16:03

Using Minecraft to teach AI about humans and their interactions 1:22:27

Should we be afraid that AI will take over the world? 1:25:08

New technologies from artificial intelligence and virtual reality to massive open online courses are beginning to disrupt existing models of learning. These technologies could help to meet rising demands for education around emerging Asia. From the rise of new global educational providers to the development of “micro” degrees and new VR tools for online learning, these technologies will also have profound implications for the way in which Higher Education policies are developed across Asia – both in developed economies like Singapore seeking to re-equip their workforce for a new era of globalisation and emerging nations attempting rapidly to increase the scale and quality of their education systems.

Find out key highlights shared by the speakers on their views of the death of traditional classrooms.

The panelist consists of:
## Mr Johannes Heinlein, Vice President, EdX

## Mr Adrian Lim, Director (Digital Participation & Foresight, Digital Readiness Cluster), Info-communications Media Development Authority (IMDA)

## Dr Suzaina Kadir, Associate Dean (Admissions, Partnerships and Programmes), Deputy Director (Academic Affairs) and Senior Lecturer, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

and is moderated by:
## Mr James Crabtree, Senior Visiting Fellow, the Centre on Asia and Globalisation, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy

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As an emergency doctor, I often find myself in the heartbreaking position of telling patients that they are much closer to death than they knew. Without that knowledge, and therefore without a plan for the kind of death they want, people often receive aggressive, uncomfortable medical care—even when they don’t want it. The ability to predict death is the stuff of myths and legends, but it’s much closer than we think: machine intelligence can provide precise predictions on a range of critical medical outcomes, and ease a great deal of suffering in the process. But do we really want those predictions? And what does better prediction with AI mean for the medical field? Ziad Obermeyer is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and a practicing emergency physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, both in Boston.

His work uses machine learning to solve critical problems in clinical medicine. As patients get older and more complex, the volume of health data grows exponentially, and it becomes harder and harder for the human mind to keep up. Dr. Obermeyer’s work is focused on applying machine learning to find hidden signals in health data, and help doctors make better decisions and drive innovations in clinical research.

He is a recipient of an Early Independence Award from the NIH Common Fund, and a faculty affiliate at ideas42, Ariadne Labs, the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University. He holds an A.B. (magna cum laude) from Harvard and an M.Phil. from Cambridge, and worked as a consultant at McKinsey & Co. in Geneva, New Jersey, and Tokyo, before returning to Harvard for his M.D (magna cum laude). This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Are humans really at risk from artificial intelligence? Will there be a rise of the machines, and if so, is that a good thing? UNSW’s Professor Toby Walsh, an expert in AI and one of Australia’s rock stars of the digital revolution, dispels some myths about AI and tells us what we should really be worried about. From UNSW’s UNSOMNIA event.

For more factual videos like this subscribe. http://www.youtube.com/user/unsw?sub_confirmation=1 We’re the official channel of UNSW Sydney, a brilliantly located university between the coast and the city.

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