In this full interview Joanna Bryson discusses the nuances of machine intelligence. Watch the interview at https://iai.tv/video/machine-intelligence-joannna-bryson?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=description Joanna Bryson discusses how she became interested in the ways different species use intelligence, how the typical tropes in science fiction misunderstand AI and the problem of anthropomorphism. In this interview, Bryson discusses the most pressing ethical challenges concerning the future of artificial intelligence and whether or not we can stabilize democracy when we have so much information about each other. She also touches on how the problems that arise with AI aren’t always to do with the technology itself but with the social conditions that often produce it. #JoannaBryson #ArtificialIntelligence #HertieSchool Joanna Bryson is professor at Hertie School in Berlin. She works on Artificial Intelligence, ethics and collaborative cognition. She advises governments, corporations, and other agencies globally, particularly on AI policy. To discover more talks, debates, interviews and academies with the world’s leading speakers visit https://iai.tv/subscribe?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=description&utm_campaign=machine-intelligence-joannna-bryson The Institute of Art and Ideas features videos and articles from cutting edge thinkers discussing the ideas that are shaping the world, from metaphysics to string theory, technology to democracy, aesthetics to genetics. Subscribe today! For debates and talks: https://iai.tv For articles: https://iai.tv/articles For courses: https://iai.tv/iai-academy/courses
This presentation was given at the GOAL International AI Conference on April 9, 2021. Among many strong and positive suggestions in the 2020 EU whitepaper on AI was at least one repeated falsehood: that AI is necessarily opaque. In fact, AI is of necessity no more opaque than natural intelligence; in fact, by digital artifacts can by choicebe made to be far more transparent. In this talk,I describe technological, sociological, and economic barriers to transparency, how these are affected by AI and the digital revolution, and what governance policies may address them. Joanna Bryson is a Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School in Berlin. Her research focuses on the impact of technology on human cooperation, and AI/ICT governance. From 2002-2019 she was at the Computer Science faculty at the University of Bath. She has also been affiliated with the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oxford, the School of Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim, and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy. Since July 2020, Prof. Bryson has been one of nine experts nominated by Germany to the Global Partnership for Artificial Intelligence. The International AI Conference took place on April 8-9, 2021. It involved interdisciplinary lectures and workshops presented by both GOAL project researchers and external speakers on the regulation of AI referring to the topic of Governance of/by algorithms from the fields of (socio-)informatics, law, ethics, economics and technology assessment.
The Schwartz Reisman weekly seminar series welcomes Joanna J. Bryson, professor of ethics and technology at the Hertie School in Berlin. She is a globally recognized leader in intelligence broadly, including AI policy and AI ethics. Bryson’s present research focuses on the impact of technology on economies and human cooperation, transparency for and through AI systems, interference in democratic regulation, the future of labour, society, and digital governance more broadly. Her work has appeared in venues ranging from a reddit to Science. As of July 2020, Bryson is one of nine experts nominated by Germany to the Global Partnership for Artificial Intelligence (GPAI). Visit her blog Adventures in NI for more on her work in natural and artificial intelligence. You can find her recommended readings from her blog below under, additional readings. Talk title: “Bias, Trust, and Doing Good: Scientific Explorations of Topics in AI Ethics” Abstract: This talk takes a scientific look at the cultural phenomena behind the #tags many people associate with AI ethics and regulation. I will introduce the concept of public goods, show how these relate to sustainability, and then provide a quick review of three recent results concerning: – What trust is, where it comes from, what it’s for, and how AI might alter it; – Where bias in language comes from, what it’s for, and whether AI might and should be used to alter it; – Where polarization comes from, what it was for historically, and how we should deal with it in the [More]
This presentation was given at the GOAL International AI Conference on April 9, 2021 organired by the ITM Münster. 00:00 Definitions for reasoning about policy 02:37 Definitions (theory of ethics) 06:07 Responsibility and Moral Actions 08:03 Enforcement AI is not a peer 10:28 Digital systems are easily transparent 16:55 The limits of transparency 20:32 AI trained on human language replicates implicit biases Among many strong and positive suggestions in the 2020 EU whitepaper on AI was at least one repeated falsehood: that AI is necessarily opaque. In fact, AI is of necessity no more opaque than natural intelligence; in fact, by digital artifacts can by choicebe made to be far more transparent. In this talk,I describe technological, sociological, and economic barriers to transparency, how these are affected by AI and the digital revolution, and what governance policies may address them. Joanna Bryson is a Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School in Berlin. Her research focuses on the impact of technology on human cooperation, and AI/ICT governance. From 2002-2019 she was at the Computer Science faculty at the University of Bath. She has also been affiliated with the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oxford, the School of Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim, and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy. Since July 2020, Prof. Bryson has been one of nine experts nominated by Germany to the Global Partnership for Artificial Intelligence. The International AI Conference took place [More]
Artificial intelligence (AI) and the information age are bringing us more information about ourselves and each other than any society has ever known. Yet at the same time it brings machines seemingly more capable of every human endeavour than any human can be. What are the limits of AI? Of intelligence and humanity more broadly? What are our ethical obligations to machines? Do these alter our obligations to each other? What is the basis of our social obligations? In her lecture Joanna Bryson will argue that there are really only two problems humanity has to solve: sustainability and inequality, or put another way: security and power. Or put a third way: how big of a pie can we make, and how do we slice up that pie? Life is not a zero-sum game. We use the security of sociality to construct public goods where everyone benefits. But still, every individual needs enough pie to thrive, and this is the challenge of inequality. Joanna Bryson will argue that understanding these processes answers the questions above. She will then look at how AI is presently affecting both these problems. Joanna J Bryson, Professor of Ethics and Technology at Hertie School, is an academic recognised for broad expertise on intelligence, its nature, and its consequences. She advises governments, transnational agencies, and NGOs globally, particularly in AI policy. She holds two degrees each in psychology and AI (BA Chicago, MSc & MPhil Edinburgh, PhD MIT). Her work has appeared in venues ranging from reddit [More]
Talk from TOA Click.Future – November 5th Speaker: Prof. Joanna Bryson, Professor of Ethics & Technology at Hertie School Berlin
Details Dr. Joanna Bryson is professor at Hertie School in Berlin. She works on Artificial Intelligence, ethics and collaborative cognition. She will join us at this edition of the London Ethics Meetup to share her insights on AI, Data & Ethics in 2020. Prof. Joanna Bryson’s current research includes accountability for and transparency in AI; understanding cultural variation in and technological impact on human cooperation, including economic and political behaviour; national and transnational governance of digital technology, the political economy of information communication technology (ICT). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_Bryson https://www.hertie-school.org/en/research/faculty-and-researchers/profile/person/bryson
Joanna Bryson, Computer Scientist at University of Bath gives the talk, “Information professionals and intelligent machines: Can we save the librarians?”
Understanding AI Ethics is difficult because clear definitions of both Intelligence and Ethics are rare. Here I describe Intelligence as generating context-specific action, and Ethics as the behaviours that create (including define) a society. I draw on these definitions to describe scientifically-grounded expectations for the impact of intelligent artefacts on human society.
The Applied Machine Learning Days channel features talks and performances from the Applied Machine Learning Days. AMLD is one of the largest machine learning & AI events in Europe, focused specifically on the applications of machine learning and AI, making it particularly interesting to industry and academia. Next edition will be held in January 26-29, 2019 @ EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Follow AMLD on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/appliedmldays AMLD Website: https://www.appliedmldays.org
Understanding how society changes itself as it develops intelligence-extending technologies is key to recognising appropriate measures for both developing and regulating AI. In this talk Professor Joanna J Bryson roots “AI ethics” in the history and even prehistory of intelligent artefacts like language and writing, then describes the role of intelligence and communication in cooperation and competition. From here she looks at the political economy of distance-reducing technologies more generally, and information communication technologies, including AI in particular. Finally she makes concrete recommendations about what this implies about how we should incorporate AI technologies into our discourse, households, and laws. For more information about Joanna and her talk, and a podcast interview, see: https://www.anthtechconf.co.uk/speaker/joanna-bryson
There’s a false narrative surrounding artificial intelligence (AI): that it cannot be regulated. These idea stems, in part, from a belief that regulations will stifle innovation and can hamper economic potential, and that the natural evolution of AI is to grow beyond its original code. In this episode of Big Tech co-hosts David Skok and Taylor Owen speak with Joanna J. Bryson, professor of ethics and technology at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin (beginning February 2020). Professor Bryson begins by explaining the difference between intelligence and AI, and how that foundational understanding can help us to see how regulations are possible in this space. “We need to be able to go back then and say, ‘okay, did you file a good process?’ A car manufacturer, they’re always recording what they did because they do a phenomenally dangerous and possibly hazard thing … and if one of them goes wrong and the brakes don’t work, we can go back and say, ‘Why did the brakes not work?’ And figure out whose fault [it] is and we can say, ‘Okay, you’ve got to do this recall. You’ve got to pay this liability, whatever.’ It’s the same thing with software,” Bryson explains. It is the responsibility of nations to protect those inside its borders, and that protection must extend to data rights. She discusses how the EU General Data Protection Regulation — a harmonized set of rules that covers a large area and crosses borders — is an example international cooperation [More]
AI expert Joanna Bryson discusses the real existential threat of AI.
Interview with Dr Joanna J Bryson talking about her work at Bath University, the new principles of robotics, qualifying definitions of AI, the ethical paradox of living forever, AI as slaves, while trying not to mention Donald Trump.
This presentation took place at the Machine Intelligence Summit in November 2016. View more videos from the event here: http://videos.re-work.co/events/10 #reworkMI Why AI Must Be Biased, and How We Can Respond Like physics and biology, computation is a natural process with natural laws. We are making radical progress in artificial intelligence because we have learnt to exploit machine learning to capture existing computational outputs developed and transmitted by humans with human culture. This powerful strategy unfortunately undermines the assumption that machined intelligence, deriving from mathematics, would be pure and neutral, providing a fairness beyond what is present in human society. In learning the set of biases that constitute a word’s meaning, AI also learns patterns some of which are based on our unfair history. Addressing such prejudice requires domain-specific interventions. Joanna J. Bryson is a transdisciplinary researcher on the structure and dynamics of human- and animal-like intelligence. Her research covers topics ranging from artificial intelligence, through autonomy and robot ethics, and on to human cooperation. She holds degrees in Psychology from Chicago (AB) and Edinburgh (MPhil), and Artificial Intelligence from Edinburgh (MSc) and MIT (ScD). She has additional professional research experience from Oxford, Harvard, and LEGO, and technical experience in Chicago’s financial industry, and international organization management consultancy. Bryson is presently a Reader (associate professor) at the University of Bath, and an affiliate of Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy.
AI has been with us for hundreds of years; there’s no “singularity” step change. Joanna Bryson explains that the main threat of AI is not that it will do anything to us but what we are already doing to each other with it—predicting and manipulating our own and others’ behavior. Subscribe to O’Reilly on YouTube: http://goo.gl/n3QSYi Follow O’Reilly on: Twitter: http://twitter.com/oreillymedia Facebook: http://facebook.com/OReilly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oreillymedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/8459/
Questions about Artificial Intelligence – such as “is AI changing us?” – lead us to much deeper questions, such as “what does intelligence mean” or even “who are we and in what are we different from chimps?”. Joanna J Bryson is a specialist of both natural and artificial intelligences. Her work focuses on AI policy and AI ethics. But before talking about AI-related ethical issues, one must clarify what we expect from AI. And what if we were to discover that we are the apes with AI? Joanna J Bryson holds degrees in Psychology from Chicago and Edinburgh, and Artificial Intelligence from Edinburgh and MIT. She is currently a Reader (tenured Associate Professor) at the University of Bath where she founded the Bath Intelligent Systems research group. She is also doing research with the Princeton Departments of Politics and Psychology. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx