Joseph works on the YOLO algorithm, a real-time algorithm for detecting and identifying objects in images. It’s technology that can be used in self-driving vehicles, cancer screening, robotics, or any other visual task. But when the military gets interested in using computer vision for drone warfare Joe starts to question the ethics of research that reinforces harmful structures of power. Joseph is a computer vision researcher and graduate student at the University of Washington. When not hacking on GPU clusters he enjoys hanging out in the Programming Languages lab learning type theory, posting random musings on arXiv, and watching the hit CW teen drama Reign with his housemates. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Ten years ago, researchers thought that getting a computer to tell the difference between a cat and a dog would be almost impossible. Today, computer vision systems do it with greater than 99 percent accuracy. How? Joseph Redmon works on the YOLO (You Only Look Once) system, an open-source method of object detection that can identify objects in images and video — from zebras to stop signs — with lightning-quick speed. In a remarkable live demo, Redmon shows off this important step forward for applications like self-driving cars, robotics and even cancer detection. Check out more TED talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED