AI has the power to transform health care. From more efficient diagnoses to safer treatments, it could remedy some of the ills suffered by patients. Film supported by @Maersk 00:00 – Can AI help heal the world? 00:45 – How can AI spot blindness? 04:01 – Protecting patients’ privacy 05:10 – How to share medical data safely 06:11 – Medical AI is rapidly expanding 08:02 – What do the sceptics say? 08.36 – Using AI for new medical devices 11:08 – What does the future hold for medical AI? Read Tim Cross’s technology quarterly report on artificial intelligence and its limits: https://econ.st/3ukriaf Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest stories: https://econ.st/3gJBH8D Will AI improve medical treatments? https://econ.st/3oi4Drm What are the potential benefits and pitfalls of medical AI? https://econ.st/3B8vo6R Listen to our podcast about how AI will be used in 20 years time: https://econ.st/3rnE99N A digital revolution in health care is speeding up: https://econ.st/32UEKX5 Watch our film on managing the risks and rewards of emerging technologies: https://econ.st/3AW5DpS Is AI capable of falling in love? Listen here: https://econ.st/3rmzEMs
China is the world leader in facial recognition technology. Discover how the country is using it to develop a vast hyper-surveillance system able to monitor and target its ethnic minorities, including the Muslim Uyghur population. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Improving lives, increasing connectivity across the world, that’s the great promise offered by data-driven technology – but in China it also promises greater state control and abuse of power. This is the next groundbreaking development in data-driven technology, facial recognition. And in China you can already withdraw cash, check in at airports, and pay for goods using just your face. The country is the world’s leader in the use of this emerging technology, and China’s many artificial intelligence startups are determined to keep it that way in the future. Companies like Yitu. Yitu is creating the building blocks for a smart city of the future, where facial recognition is part of everyday life. This could even extend to detecting what people are thinking. But the Chinese government has plans to use this new biometric technology to cement its authoritarian rule. The country has ambitious plans to develop a vast national surveillance system based on facial recognition. It’ll be used to monitor it’s 1.4 billion citizens in unprecedented ways. With the capability of tracking everything from their emotions to their sexuality. The primary means will be a vast network of CCTV cameras. 170 million are already in place and an estimated 400 million new ones will [More]
Artificial intelligence is already shaping the world, from driverless cars to dating. But according to Dr Eric Topol, a pioneer in digital medicine, perhaps its greatest impact will be on people’s health. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
The world of work will be radically different in the future. From hyper-surveillance of staff to digital nomadism to robots taking jobs—how, where and why we work is changing beyond all recognition. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy This is the workforce of the future. Technology is transforming the world of work beyond all recognition creating groundbreaking opportunities. But it’s also eroding the rights of workers. Some even fear a dystopian jobless future. But are these anxieties overblown? How we react to this brave new world of work today will shape societies for generations to come. What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
This is a fairly short and hard-hitting talk (followed by a brief conversation with Tom Standage / The Economist) on how technology is changing our culture, society, business and humanity in general, covering artificial intelligence and cognitive computing, quantum computing, digital ethics, technology addiction and abdication, and almost all themes from Gerd’s new book ‘Technology vs Humanity’, see http://www.techvshuman.com/technology-vs-humanity-gerds-bottom-lines-and-key-messages/ for the key messages. Thanks to The Economist for inviting me, and for sharing this video. Find out more about the Berlin Innovation Summit here: https://events.economist.com/events-conferences/emea/innovation-summit-europe/ You can download the slide-deck via my blog http://gerd.io/2uWC3Oc If you enjoy my videos and talks, please consider my new book “Technology vs Humanity” http://www.techvshuman.com Buy the book via Amazon http://gerd.fm/globalTVHamazon (50+ 5* reviews) This is what the book is all about: Are you ready for the greatest changes in recent human history? Futurism meets humanism in Gerd Leonhard’s ground-breaking new work of critical observation, discussing the multiple Megashifts that will radically alter not just our society and economy but our values and our biology. Wherever you stand on the scale between technomania and nostalgia for a lost world, this is a book to challenge, provoke, warn and inspire Gerd Leonhard Futurist, Humanist, Author and Keynote Speaker CEO The Futures Agency Zürich / Switzerland http://www.futuristgerd.com or www.gerdleonhard.de Download all of my videos and PDFs at http://www.gerdcloud.net Please note: audio-only versions of many videos are being made available via SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/gleonhard/tracks Most of my previous books, presentations and slideshows are available via http://www.gerdcloud.com
Facial recognition technology will transform the way we live in 2018. Machines that can read and recognise our faces will go mainstream, opening up exciting possibilities and posing new dangers Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 In 2018 machines that can read your face will go mainstream, changing the way we live. Your face will become your password, unlocking smartphones and bank accounts, but the technology will also have the power to covertly track your movements. It will even be able to guess your sexuality through facial features alone. In 2018 we’ll be forced to face the future. The human face has an astonishing variety of features which not only help us recognize others, but read and understand them through a constant flow of intentional and unintentional signals. It’s one of the unique functions that separates man from machine, until now. Pioneering facial recognition technology hasn’t yet hit the mainstream. In 2018 it will be in our pockets. But using your face to unlock your phone is just the beginning. In the suburbs of Israel’s financial center, Tel Aviv, a team of engineers is at the forefront of a technological revolution. They’re teaching machines to read faces. The software has the power to identify one face from millions in under one second and it’s this precision that makes the technology an effective new tool for surveillance. Retail stores are using this technology to generate data on customers; tracking their shopping habits and targeting in-store adverts. Churches [More]