#computationalcreativity #aritificialintelligence What is Computational Humor in AI? Computational Creativity in AI Meaning, Computational Creativity in AI Definition, Computational Creativity in AI Explanation || RealizeTheTerms
Advances in Artificial Intelligence are changing everything around us. Are art and creativity immune from the perceived AI takeover? In this talk, Dr. Ahmed Elgammal will highlight the symbiotic relationship between AI and art. He will argue why investigating perceptual and cognitive tasks related to human creativity is essential to advancing AI and how AI is changing the way art is made. Dr Ahmed Elgammal is the director of the Art and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and a professor of computer science at Rutgers University. He is the founder and CEO of Artrendex, a startup that builds innovative AI technology for the art market. Dr. Elgammal research on knowledge discovery in art history and AI art generation, received wide international media attention, including reports on the Washington Post, New York Times, NBC News, the Daily Telegraph, Science News, New Scientist, and many others. In 2017, an Artsy editorial acclaimed AICAN as “the biggest artistic achievement of the year”. In 2016, a TV segment about his research, produced for PBS, won an Emmy award. AICAN art has been shown in several technology and art venues in Los Angeles, Frankfurt, San Francisco, and New York City. Looking for more? Check out EGG On Air! https://bit.ly/37GhXMY CHECK OUT DATAIKU: https://bit.ly/36XBlpK BRIGHTTALK WEBINARS: https://bit.ly/33TIRjn DATA SCIENCE PIONEERS DOCUMENTARY: https://bit.ly/36V3rBF PARTNER ECOSYSTEM: https://bit.ly/3oCbk5k DATAIKU ACADEMY: https://bit.ly/2LjsEgZ DATAIKU COMMUNITY: https://bit.ly/2K8lOtV DATA SCIENCE AND ANALYTICS MEETUPS: https://bit.ly/3n0ar5R BANANA DATA PODCAST: https://bit.ly/36UFgDs Linkedin: https://bit.ly/3lXyRMb Twitter: @dataiku Instagram: @dataiku Turn on our channel notifications for the latest data science and [More]
Artificial intelligence has significantly advanced computer software and its corresponding services across several fields. Yet, several AI pioneers question the “intelligence” of our current technologies, arguing that their capabilities are limited to systematic observation and generalized description of data. The Arts, including fine and performing Arts, can be seen as an ideal testbed for artificial intelligence as these fields have in the core of their artistic process human creativity, one of the key characteristics of human intelligence. This presentation will review the state-of-the-art methods in the field of Computational Creativity and open discussions on the future of Artificial Intelligence in the Arts. This talk was part of the AI Advances and its Applications seminar series. November 4, 2020.
Ideas in Interactive Media Andrew R. Brown Professor of Digital Arts, Griffith University
Advances in Artificial Intelligence are changing everything around us. Are art and creativity immune from the perceived AI takeover? In this talk, Dr. Ahmed Elgammal will highlight the symbiotic relationship between Ai and art. He will argue why investigating perceptual and cognitive tasks related to human creativity is essential to advancing AI and how AI is changing the way art is made.
To book artificial intelligence and creativity keynote speaker James Taylor to keynote at your next meeting or event go to https://www.jamestaylor.me
AI continues to push the limits of what is possible with machine learning successes in self-driving cars and facial recognition, but is often assumed to be off-limits from areas like artistic creation. However, computer science professor Steve Engels sees AI’s creative potential. In his talk, Steve will show how AI can model human creative processes, and how creativity is definitely not off-limits! This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Created by Joshua Gould, Prepared for the Digital Media Innovation (Summer 2018) course at Rutgers’ School of Communication & Information as a part of the Graduate Program in Digital Media & Communication. Interactive Presentation: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KBheC_FghDL5lDiJwzf7VsSIC5b8Dz7j/view?usp=sharing Preface from project proposal: In the information age, developments in artificial intelligence have unlocked new forms of creativity and content in media. AI, or artificial intelligence, is a truly phenomenal and transformative technology. Cognitive computing has unlocked our ability to extract insights and actions from big data, enables cars to drive themselves and can even create flawless works of art like Rembrandt. We are witnessing a Cambrian explosion of artificial intelligence that ushers advancements in virtual agents’ visual perception and their application towards new art forms and tools. How can we leverage machine learning and artificial intelligence to create in new ways? This proposal outlines the basic concept, project timetable and viability of a media prototype entitled: AI-nimation. Conceptually, AI-nimation would be a machine-learning tool, leveraging algorithms and neural networks programmed to scan specific visual data, capable of generating animations (or collages) from text-driven descriptions. Similar to functions of computer vision and pattern recognition, AI-nimation would be able to analyze novel text input, or plain-language, and through a database of visual elements create a temporal-layout of mentioned characters and objects. In laymen terms, AI-nimation would be able to intake general scene captions, containing character, prop and location descriptions, and create computer-animated scene videos. In theory, this tool truly enables machine learning and artificial intelligence to [More]
Computational creativity—a subdomain of artificial intelligence concerned with systems that replicate or assist human creative endeavors—has been the  subject of academic inquiry for decades. Now, with recent improvements in machine learning techniques and the rising popularity of all things AI, computational creativity is a medium for critically and commercially successful works of art. From a 2016 Rembrandt to Jukedeck’s instant music (or muzak?), AI-assisted and AI-driven works are a reality. This raises mind-bending questions about the nature of creativity, the relationship between the artist and the viewer, even the existence of free will. For many lawyers, it also raises a more immediate question: who owns all of this art? Cyberlaw Clinicians Jess Fjeld and Mason Kortz discuss copyright in AI-generated works, the need for a shared understanding of what is and isn’t up for grabs in a license, and how forward-thinking contracts can prevent AI developers and artists from having their rights decided by our (often notoriously backwards-looking) legal system. Learn more about this event here: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2018/luncheon/05/Fjeld_Kortz
Peter Bock discusses the evolution of Artificial Intelligence and states his intention of creating the world’s first artificial being. He shows the capabilities of the current system, known as ALISA, in creating works of art. Peter Bock is a Professor Emeritus of the Department of Computer Science at The George Washington University. During his 40-year career, Peter has focused on developing his biologically-inspired statistical learning theory, known as Collective Learning Systems (CLS), to provide essential knowledge for reverse engineering the brain and understanding cognition. He worked with NASA as part of the Apollo Program. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
What’s more clever…the human brain or a computer chip? Wach the full program now: https://www.worldsciencefestival.com/videos/computational-creativity-ai-art-ingenuity/ Today, there are robots that make art, move like dancers, tell stories, and even help human chefs devise unique recipes. But is there ingenuity in silico? Can computers be creative? A rare treat for the senses, this thought-provoking event brings together artists and computer scientists who are creating original works with the help of artificially intelligent machines. Joined by leading experts in psychology and neuroscience, they’ll explore the roots of creativity in humans and computers, what artificial creativity reveals about human imagination, and the future of hybrid systems that build on the capabilities of both. This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest
SYNOPSIS: Will a computer ever be more creative than a human? In this compelling program, artists, musicians, neuroscientists, and computer scientists explore the future of artistry and imagination in the age of artificial intelligence. PARTICIPANTS: Sougwen Chung, Jesse Engel, Peter Ulric Tse, Lav Varshney MODERATOR: John Schaefer Original program date: MAY 31, 2017 WATCH THE TRAILER: https://youtu.be/O6t7I_iVim8 WATCH THE LIVE Q&A W/JESSE ENGEL: https://youtu.be/UXyMiSURQ7Y FULL DESCRIPTION: Today, there are robots that make art, move like dancers, tell stories, and even help human chefs devise unique recipes. But is there ingenuity in silico? Can computers be creative? A rare treat for the senses, this thought-provoking event brings together artists and computer scientists who are creating original works with the help of artificially intelligent machines. Joined by leading experts in psychology and neuroscience, they’ll explore the roots of creativity in humans and computers, what artificial creativity reveals about human imagination, and the future of hybrid systems that build on the capabilities of both. MORE INFO ABOUT THE PROGRAM AND PARTICIPANTS: https://www.worldsciencefestival.com/programs/computational-creativity/ This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation. – Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF – Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ – Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival/ – Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest TOPICS: – AI and the Art of Ingenuity 00:06 – Participant Introductions 02:51 – What are the pros and cons of AI creativity? 4:27 – Where did computational creativity start? 9:32 – What is [More]