This presentation was given at the GOAL International AI Conference on April 9, 2021. Among many strong and positive suggestions in the 2020 EU whitepaper on AI was at least one repeated falsehood: that AI is necessarily opaque. In fact, AI is of necessity no more opaque than natural intelligence; in fact, by digital artifacts can by choicebe made to be far more transparent. In this talk,I describe technological, sociological, and economic barriers to transparency, how these are affected by AI and the digital revolution, and what governance policies may address them. Joanna Bryson is a Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School in Berlin. Her research focuses on the impact of technology on human cooperation, and AI/ICT governance. From 2002-2019 she was at the Computer Science faculty at the University of Bath. She has also been affiliated with the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oxford, the School of Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim, and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy. Since July 2020, Prof. Bryson has been one of nine experts nominated by Germany to the Global Partnership for Artificial Intelligence. The International AI Conference took place on April 8-9, 2021. It involved interdisciplinary lectures and workshops presented by both GOAL project researchers and external speakers on the regulation of AI referring to the topic of Governance of/by algorithms from the fields of (socio-)informatics, law, ethics, economics and technology assessment.
This presentation was given at the GOAL International AI Conference on April 9, 2021 organired by the ITM Münster. 00:00 Definitions for reasoning about policy 02:37 Definitions (theory of ethics) 06:07 Responsibility and Moral Actions 08:03 Enforcement AI is not a peer 10:28 Digital systems are easily transparent 16:55 The limits of transparency 20:32 AI trained on human language replicates implicit biases Among many strong and positive suggestions in the 2020 EU whitepaper on AI was at least one repeated falsehood: that AI is necessarily opaque. In fact, AI is of necessity no more opaque than natural intelligence; in fact, by digital artifacts can by choicebe made to be far more transparent. In this talk,I describe technological, sociological, and economic barriers to transparency, how these are affected by AI and the digital revolution, and what governance policies may address them. Joanna Bryson is a Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School in Berlin. Her research focuses on the impact of technology on human cooperation, and AI/ICT governance. From 2002-2019 she was at the Computer Science faculty at the University of Bath. She has also been affiliated with the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oxford, the School of Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim, and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy. Since July 2020, Prof. Bryson has been one of nine experts nominated by Germany to the Global Partnership for Artificial Intelligence. The International AI Conference took place [More]