This House would ban the play of augmented reality games in public places.

The integration of digital information with a real-world environment – augmented reality! From science-fiction pipe dream to practical reality, AR games are changing the very nature of gaming these days. However, augmented reality games mean augmented security risks. Is it really safe to play these games in public places, or should they be banned?

On the fifth episode of "Intelligence – High School Debate," students from Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Sangmoon High School, Dongducheon Foreign Language High School and Eunkwang Girls' High School debate over the motion "This House would ban the play of AR games in public places."

So, which two teams will make it into the semifinals this week?

다섯 번째 토론 대결의 출전 학교는 바로
[민족사관고등학교 vs 상문고등학교 vs 동두천외국어고등학교 vs 은광여자고등학교]

긴장감이 흐르는 가운데 밝혀진 다섯 번째 토론 주제!

공공장소에서 증강현실 게임 플레이를 금지한다.

언제 어디서나, 불특정 다수가 즐길 수 있는 증강현실 게임으로 인해 높아진 안전사고 발생률! 각종 경고 문구에도 불구하고 게임의 인기가 올라갈수록 사고율 또한 증가하는데...
게임에 관해 할 말 많은 청소년들! 결국 시간 내에 발언을 끝내지 못해 당황한 참가자부터
단단히 벼르고 나온 듯 자연스러운 모션과 함께 POI에 막힘없이 대처하는 참가자까지~

어딜 가도 뒤지지 않는 네 팀 중 준결승전에 진출할 단 두 팀?

Part 01 - Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, .

Part 02 - Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, .

The ASU Origins Project is a transdisciplinary initiative that nurtures research, energizes teaching, and builds partnerships, offering new possibilities for .

Part 02 - Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, .

Part 01 - Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, .

Elon Musk and other panellists talk AI and answer the question: “If we succeed in building human-level Artificial general intelligence (AGI), then what are the .

Einstein's Legacy | An Origins Project by Lawrence Krauss P1.

Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, or could it present a threat to the very basis of human civilization?.

Join critically-acclaimed author and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins and world-renowned theoretical physicist and author Lawrence Krauss as they . Join critically-acclaimed author.

The evening began with a lecture from Lawrence Krauss. Then we move into a dialogue between Lawrence Krauss & Matt Dillahunty. This event took place at the Danforth Music Hall in Toronto on.

This video highlights debates and discussions regarding the future impact of artificial intelligence!

Source material can be found below...

AI Learns the Art of Debate
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeF_N1r91RQ

Debate on Artificial Intelligence with IBM CEO, Microsoft CEO and the head of MIT Media Lab
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fw79AXL-sys

Avi Goldfarb & Ajay Agrawal: "Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of AI" | Talks at Google
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByvPp5xGL1I

Ethics of AI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcI_IYHjZYg

Einstein's Legacy | An Origins Project by Lawrence Krauss P1.

Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, or could it present a threat to the very basis of human civilization?.

Join critically-acclaimed author and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins and world-renowned theoretical physicist and author Lawrence Krauss as they . Join critically-acclaimed author.

On Wednesday December 6th, two teams of UTS academics and industry partners gathered at UTS for the hotly anticipated “Humans, Data, AI & Ethics – Great Debate”. The rhetorical battle raised the provocative proposition that:

“Humans have blown it: it’s time to turn the planet over to the machines”
The debate was preceded by our daytime Conversation which featured engaging panel discussions and Lightning Talks from UTS academics and partners in government and industry.

The debate took place in front of a large audience of colleagues and members of the public on the UTS Broadway campus. The Affirmative team (The Machines) argued that a productive relationship between humans and machines will help us to build a fairer, more efficient and more ecologically sustainable global society. Numerous examples of humanity’s gross dysfunction in governance and management were raised, from human-induced climate change to widening inequality and the recent election of unpredictable populist leaders. The team argued that finely (and ethically) tuned machines will help humans to solve these immense social and environmental challenges and maintain standards of equality, fairness and sustainability.

The Negative team (The Humans) cautioned against the rapid adoption of these hypothetical “ethical machines”, raising concerns about existing human prejudices and biases being built into AI. The team envisaged a dystopian world in which machines deny the possibility of human creativity, error or “happy accidents”, which have lead to so many important moments of discovery throughout history. According to the Negative, there are also numerous social services which as yet cannot be performed by AI. Healthcare provision for example, strongly depends on complex emotional intelligence, human tact and an ability to empathise and build rapport.

Ultimately, the Negative were adjudicated as the winner of the debate, to the relief of humanists and ethicists in attendance. The theatrical and good-humoured event was a rousing success, giving leading thinkers in the data science field an opportunity to flesh out challenging ideas surrounding data, AI, society and ethics in a responsive public forum.

https://utscic.edu.au/events/humans-data-ai-ethics-great-debate/

Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, or could it present a threat to the very basis of human civilization? The future of artificial intelligence is up for debate, and the Origins Project is bringing together a distinguished panel of experts, intellectuals and public figures to discuss who’s in control. Eric Horvitz, Jaan Tallinn, Kathleen Fisher and Subbarao Kambhampati join Origins Project director Lawrence Krauss.

Recorded Saturday, February 25th, 2017

Eric Horvitz is managing director of Microsoft Research’s main Redmond Lab, an American computer scientist, and technical fellow at Microsoft. Horvitz received his PhD and MD degrees at Stanford University, and has continued his research and work in areas that span theoretical and practical challenges of machine learning and inference, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and more. He is a fellow of numerous associations and academies, has received numerous awards, given both technical lectures and presentations for diverse audiences, and been featured in the New York Times and Technology Review.

Jaan Tallinn is co-founder of Skype, Estonian programmer, investor and physicist. He is partner and co-founder of the development company Bluemoon, Board of Sponsors member of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and one of the founders of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk and the Future of Life Institute. He strongly promotes the study of existential risk and artificial intelligence, and the long-term planning and mitigation of potential challenges.

Kathleen Fisher is a professor in and the chair of the Computer Science Department at Tufts University. Previously, she was a program manager at DARPA where she started and managed the HACMS and PPAML programs, a consulting faculty member in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and a principal member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Labs Research. Kathleen's research focuses on advancing the theory and practice of programming languages and on applying ideas from the programming language community to the problem of ad hoc data management.

Subbarao Kambhampati is a professor of Computer Science at ASU, and is the current president of the Association for the Advancement of AI (AAAI). His research focuses on automated planning and decision making, especially in the context of human-aware AI systems. He is an award-winning teacher and spends significant time pondering the public perceptions and societal impacts of AI. He was an NSF young investigator, and is a fellow of AAAI. He received his bachelor’s degree from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and his PhD from University of Maryland, College Park.

Lawrence Krauss is an author, professor, physicist, public intellectual and Director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University, where he is also Foundation Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Department of Physics.

Video by Black Chalk Productions.

Part 01 - https://youtu.be/rZe-A2aDOgA

Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, or could it present a threat to the very basis of human civilization? The future of artificial intelligence is up for debate, and the Origins Project is bringing together a distinguished panel of experts, intellectuals and public figures to discuss who’s in control. Eric Horvitz, Jaan Tallinn, Kathleen Fisher and Subbarao Kambhampati join Lawrence Krauss.

Recorded Saturday, February 25th, 2017

Eric Horvitz is managing director of Microsoft Research’s main Redmond Lab, an American computer scientist, and technical fellow at Microsoft. Horvitz received his PhD and MD degrees at Stanford University, and has continued his research and work in areas that span theoretical and practical challenges of machine learning and inference, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and more. He is a fellow of numerous associations and academies, has received numerous awards, given both technical lectures and presentations for diverse audiences, and been featured in the New York Times and Technology Review.

Jaan Tallinn is co-founder of Skype, Estonian programmer, investor and physicist. He is partner and co-founder of the development company Bluemoon, Board of Sponsors member of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and one of the founders of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk and the Future of Life Institute. He strongly promotes the study of existential risk and artificial intelligence, and the long-term planning and mitigation of potential challenges.

Kathleen Fisher is a professor in and the chair of the Computer Science Department at Tufts University. Previously, she was a program manager at DARPA where she started and managed the HACMS and PPAML programs, a consulting faculty member in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and a principal member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Labs Research. Kathleen's research focuses on advancing the theory and practice of programming languages and on applying ideas from the programming language community to the problem of ad hoc data management.

Subbarao Kambhampati is a professor of Computer Science at ASU, and is the current president of the Association for the Advancement of AI (AAAI). His research focuses on automated planning and decision making, especially in the context of human-aware AI systems. He is an award-winning teacher and spends significant time pondering the public perceptions and societal impacts of AI. He was an NSF young investigator, and is a fellow of AAAI. He received his bachelor’s degree from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and his PhD from University of Maryland, College Park.

Lawrence Krauss is an author, professor, physicist, and public intellectual.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Video by Black Chalk Productions.

Part 02 - https://youtu.be/eXc5cWEkb4Y

Will progress in Artificial Intelligence provide humanity with a boost of unprecedented strength to realize a better future, or could it present a threat to the very basis of human civilization? The future of artificial intelligence is up for debate, and the Origins Project is bringing together a distinguished panel of experts, intellectuals and public figures to discuss who’s in control. Eric Horvitz, Jaan Tallinn, Kathleen Fisher and Subbarao Kambhampati join Lawrence Krauss.

Recorded Saturday, February 25th, 2017

Eric Horvitz is managing director of Microsoft Research’s main Redmond Lab, an American computer scientist, and technical fellow at Microsoft. Horvitz received his PhD and MD degrees at Stanford University, and has continued his research and work in areas that span theoretical and practical challenges of machine learning and inference, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and more. He is a fellow of numerous associations and academies, has received numerous awards, given both technical lectures and presentations for diverse audiences, and been featured in the New York Times and Technology Review.

Jaan Tallinn is co-founder of Skype, Estonian programmer, investor and physicist. He is partner and co-founder of the development company Bluemoon, Board of Sponsors member of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and one of the founders of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk and the Future of Life Institute. He strongly promotes the study of existential risk and artificial intelligence, and the long-term planning and mitigation of potential challenges.

Kathleen Fisher is a professor in and the chair of the Computer Science Department at Tufts University. Previously, she was a program manager at DARPA where she started and managed the HACMS and PPAML programs, a consulting faculty member in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and a principal member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Labs Research. Kathleen's research focuses on advancing the theory and practice of programming languages and on applying ideas from the programming language community to the problem of ad hoc data management.

Subbarao Kambhampati is a professor of Computer Science at ASU, and is the current president of the Association for the Advancement of AI (AAAI). His research focuses on automated planning and decision making, especially in the context of human-aware AI systems. He is an award-winning teacher and spends significant time pondering the public perceptions and societal impacts of AI. He was an NSF young investigator, and is a fellow of AAAI. He received his bachelor’s degree from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and his PhD from University of Maryland, College Park.

Lawrence Krauss is an author, professor, physicist, and public intellectual.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Video by Black Chalk Productions.