Can a robot pass a university entrance exam? | Noriko Arai

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Meet Todai Robot, an AI project that performed in the top 20 percent of students on the entrance exam for the University of Tokyo — without actually understanding a thing. While it’s not matriculating anytime soon, Todai Robot’s success raises alarming questions for the future of human education. How can we help kids learn the things that humans can do better than AI?
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Comments

カラフル☆ブレイン says:

I'm sorry, but as an educator in Japan, it's a bit frustrating that Noriko Arai's final conclusion is that "students need to learn how to read better." Of course they do, but does Arai realize why they don't? For the answer, all she has to do is look at the entrance exam for her own university. As demonstrated by her own AI research, there are very few questions that actually test true reading comprehension or deep thinking, even though the University of Tokyo is supposedly one of the best schools in Japan. It's easy to say "we need to teach students better reading skills", but for better or worse these entrance exams are used as a benchmark for what students need to learn, so it really shouldn't be surprising that students' reading abilities are declining when even top universities don't test for basic comprehension.

If people really want to help students, they would do much better by talking to university admissions departments than placing the blame on something as nebulous as education in general. The current curriculum will only change once universities realize that their own ivory towers are built upon the very tenets that they are preaching against.

mohson khalaf says:

about that issue i think ai like notebook (smart notebook)

mohson khalaf says:

many thanks for arab translate شكرا للترجمه بالغه العربيه

Mark Van Reeth says:

Can someone please develop an AI that can translate whatever she's saying into human speech? I tried listening to the podcast version in the car, but wasn't able to understand half of it. 🙁

Liêm Nguyễn Huỳnh says:

thank you for giving me the meaning of AIs

Aaryan Dewan says:

Boy, this is the future

Sobieski526 says:

I think the study is flawed as the computer has access to infinite information & solutions available on the internet. A smart person equipped with a smartphone and a good understanding of search engine capabilities can do the same job in general knowledge and even essay writing. Math might be harder but still doable using online tools for assistance. It would be interesting to see the AI that can compartmentalise and store information as humans do without having access to the worldwide web. Yet she has a good point – we urgently need to teach people how to read, process, and access this wide pool of information availiable to us!

CDmc98 says:

I can't believe the overtime sign isn't more discussed
12:16

Axphey007 says:

She should also start lullaby yt channel

Gaurav Deora says:

Why no one is talking about this?
https://youtu.be/SBLpt-vQs8s

2023Tobechukwu M974 says:

what if wikepedia is wrong

What Ever says:

AI isn't thinking, its still doing a very narrow, specific task which is written by a human. This is not AI yet.

Nicolas Micaux says:

Very interesting

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